M ost of my longest journeys have been through South East Asia and in the Indian sub-continent. South America is just next on my bucket list. In the backpackers’ world, these two maxi regions are a destination of choice for many. An interesting aspect that they have in common is that they are both characterized by a predominance of developing countries, with large poverty-stricken areas, unstable political situations, scarce social justice and deeply-rooted corruption.

Despite being popular in the backpackers’ world, these destinations can leave friends and families a bit puzzled, if they aren’t accustomed to long distance travel.

  • “Why the hell do you need to cross half the world to stay in hostel with 10 other people in a dorm without a flush toilet?!”
  • “What’s the point of traveling to a Country ruled by a dictator?”
  • “Will you have enough medical support if you get sick?”
  • “Are you ok with seeing all that poverty while on vacation?”
  • “We have wonderful beaches here in Italy, people come from all over the world to see them, and you want to go to the Philippines just for a beach vacation?!”

These are some of the most common objections I get from non-so-frequent travellers and the elders of my family and colleagues.
Of course one of the reasons for the popularity of developing countries is the low cost of life. Food, accommodation and bus rides are way less expensive than in the western world. Traveling for a month in South East Asia can only cost a fraction of a month of everyday life in a major European city.

But being dirt cheap is not
the only reason that leads me,
and many others,
to travel to developing countries.
Here are some more meaningful ones.

 

Southern Bangladesh
Southern Bangladesh

1 – Enjoying Raw natural beauty

Lush forests to dreamy beaches; thick juggles to volcanoes; corals reef and surf breaks. Tropical Countries are a paradise for nature lovers. Some of my favourite places are Bali and the Gili Islands, Thailand Beaches and the Northern Forests of the Golden Triangle

2 – Witnessing a very different culture.

The further you go, the more different will be the traditions, the way of living and the customs. Your curiosity is as big as the locals’, ad you can end up in very interesting conversations or just in funny exchanges of pointing and laughing. By traveling this far you discover that the westerner way of living is not the only one, and for some of us may not be the best. In terms of cultural heritage, the place that struck me the most is Angkor Wat and its temples in Cambodia.

 

Cabo de Rama, Goa
Palolem, Goa

3- Traveling back in time

This is my favourite one. I realized this in India, where it is pretty evident. Traveling in a Country that hasn’t been completely overturned by modernity and technology and that jealously preserves its colours and culture is simply magic! When wandering through the streets of Varanasi, you can sense that nothing has changed for thousands of years. Same cows wandering freely in the narrow lanes, same crumbling buildings, same hustlers, same religious traditions. At a funeral, the family follows the porters crisscrossing through the narrow lanes, keeping the crowd at bay by chanting and ringing bells. Rags covered wood-porters march with their heavy loads to the burning Ghats. The legend says that the flames of the funeral pyres at Manikarnika Ghats have been burning for some 3,000 years. Being able to witness such an ancient ceremony for me is just pure time travel magic. Check out my Varanasi photo set.

4 – Developing awareness of the international social and political issues

Witnessing poverty and social injustice really open our eyes on the world problems. Experiencing developing countries living conditions or listening to stories from the locals is way more powerful and conscience-awakening than just reading an article on the news. Going to see with our own eyes is necessary, considering that these places usually do not make the news in the western world. Learn more about Burma here or have a look at the pictures I took there.

Varanasi, India
Varanasi, India

5 – Acknowledging how blessed we are

Another effect of witnessing poverty and social injustice is gaining perspective on our own lives. It made me reconsider how many things I took for granted. How lucky I am to be born in a country at peace and never having experienced war or sickness. Lucky to live in a democracy; to live in a Country that (at least on paper) consider man and women equal, where birth control pills and abortion are legal, where medical care is good and free for everyone, as it is school; where police and justice is not (so) corrupt. I’m sure that many of my fellow nationals may have a say on this. In some case I may agree with them but, in the big picture, seeing the living conditions of developing countries made me reconsider my daily complaints and sorrows. See my photo series on Rural Bangladesh and my Bangladeshi portraits.

6 – Discovering that, when it comes to the human race, affinities are more than differences

I learned that despite the differences we are all the same people. When it comes to feelings, many things are the same wherever in the world. The love of a mother that feeds his newborn while waiting for a train in India, the worry of a wife in the Philippines when she tells the story of her husband being attacked by a shark, the colourful happiness of kids playing in front of a school in Bangladesh, the crankiness, or the kindness, of old people. Joy, anger, sadness, fear, love: we do feel them in the same all over the world. We’re all humans.

Traveling by train in India
Jaisalmer, India

7- You don’t need so much to be happy

Who doesn’t enjoy luxury, in theory? Staying in an infinity-pool-hotel with an extra-large suitcase, filled with fancy dresses. Well, Asia taught me that being bare foot on the grass, wearing the same three plain outfits for weeks and sleeping in an open dorm with ten other people without flushing toilets nor hot showers is enough to make me the happiest person in the world. Having a laid back lifestyle, waking up with the sun and being surrounded by interesting people and fierce nature is eye opening on how many bullshits our rich Westerner society consider necessary to be happy. Discover my dearest paradise island in the Pilippines.

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